Topic

2.1 Airspace Specifications

Topic Progress:

Airspace is divided into two categories, Regulatory Airspace ( Class A, B, C, D, and E airspace areas, restricted and prohibited areas.) and Non-Regulatory Airspace (Class G airspace, military operations areas, warning areas, alert areas, and controlled firing areas.)

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Regulatory Airspace:

Class A Airspace – Extends from 18,000 feet MSL (Mean Sea Level) up to flight level 600 (60,000 feet).

Class B Airspace – Controlled airspace that is outlined in a solid blue line, labeled with delimiting arcs, radials, and altitudes that vary in size from one airport to another. Class B airspace sectors are centered to larger airports and extends from as low as the surface up to specified altitudes.

Class C Airspace – Controlled airspace outlined in solid magenta line, composed of two circles, centered to the primary airport. The inner shelf has a radius of 4 nautical miles that extends from the surface up to 4,000 feet and the outer shelf has a radius of 10 nautical miles that extends from 1,200 feet AGL up to 4,000 feet.

Class D Airspace – Controlled airspace outlined in blue dashed line, extending from the surface up to approximately 2,500 feet AGL. Normally a 4 nautical mile radius centered around a designated airport/s (actual altitude is as needed).

Class E Airspace – Controlled airspace outlined in magenta shading, starting at 700 feet AGL (Above Ground Level), and no shading (or blue shading if next to class G airspace) depicts class E airspace starting at 1,200 feet AGL.

Surface Class E Airspace is identified by a dashed magenta line

 

Non-Regulatory Airspace:

Class G Airspace – Uncontrolled airspace that typically extends from the surface up to the base of the overlying class E airspace (normally 700 or 1,200 feet AGL).

Other Airspace (Special Use Airspace)

Prohibited Areas – Sectors of airspace within which the flight of an aircraft is prohibited. (Blue hash marks on a sectional chart and labeled by a P-ID#)

Restricted Airspace – Consists of unusual, often invisible, hazards to an aircraft such as artillery firing, aerial gunnery, or guided missiles. (Blue hash marks on sectional chart and labeled by a R-ID#) It is the remote PIC’s responsibility to be informed of the Restricted Airspace (hot or cold).

Warning Areas – Contains the same exact hazards as restricted airspace but are located in international airspace. (Blue hash marks on a sectional chart and labeled by a W-ID#)

Alert Areas – ( Alerting you of something) Typically contains a high volume of pilot training activities or an unusual type of aerial activity. Acceptable to fly in considering it does not lye in regulatory airspace. (Magenta hash marks on a sectional chart and is identified by an A-ID#)

MOA (Military Operations Area)- Magenta Hash marks. Acceptable to fly in however, it is the remote pic’s responsibility to exercise extreme caution of course considering the MOA does not fall in regulatory airspace.

Military Training Routs– Military Training Routs consists of IFR (IR) and VFR (VR) routs. The routs are typically established below 10,000 feet MSL for operations in excess of 250 knots and used to maintain proficiency in tactical flying.  (Light grey line on a sectional chart labeled with the type of rout followed by the rout identification number in magenta. Ex. IR23 and VR1005)

Military training routs with no segment above 1500 feet AGL are identified by 4 numbers, routs that include one or more segments above 1500 feet AGL are identified by 3 numbers or less.

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